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Welcome to Adam & Eve Baby Wear! Adam and Eve Baby Wear Is an % Australian owned, family operated online baby clothing store that sells the upmost fashionable and stylish baby clothes online.

In this case Herod killed the babes, not as soon as the Magi departed, but two years after: This one sent everyone out into the night as apostles, convinced they'd seen the show to end all shows… until Tuesday night in Sydney, when the ashes of Saturday night will be whisked away and the fire lit anew. While I thought that scheduling was unusual, I was certain there would be a surprise or two as the evening progressed. Later transitions also mean greater levels of medical intervention down the line to relieve gender dysphoria such as facial surgery.

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Willem van Dullemen is the owner and passionate Vintage clothing collector. I know Willem also as a fabulous blues guitar player. Becoming a rockabilly fashionista can be expensive. So is there a way to beat the recession and look fabulous while saving money? Why, yes my lovelies, there is. Why not make your own clothes? YouTube and other sites of the like can give you tutorials on sewing techniques, tips and tricks. I myself am venturing into the world of making my own clothes and was overwhelmed by the very thought of it.

I can not sew, I thought, my clothes will look home made and drab, I kept saying. But this is not the case. Janet is the founder of Rockabilly Kids. We must have had more fun Friday night than we knew, because no one could be roused until 1: They had an awfully tempting selection of gelato too — perhaps we would come back later for that.

The front of the café was open to the sidewalk, so we sat in the delicious early afternoon breeze and watched passersby. Later that day, some mutual friends of the festival from Las Vegas, Heather and Rolando, drove me into Old Port , the historic district of Old Montreal. Eroded cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages, art galleries, and umbrella festooned sidewalk eateries marked this wonderful part of the city.

The solid old stone buildings towered on either side of the streets, at once gracious and imposing. I ordered a rosé and gazed at the people passing by from behind my big dark sunglasses. Then… a familiar figure emerged from the crowd. There is something about me.. Which Pin-up Girl Are You? Posted by Sophia Florence On September - 12 - Posted by Sophia Florence On September - 1 - Vintage Clothes Are Foul Smelling.

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It's all one big story, and one big piece of music. But what is the story? It may not be what you think — that's another magic trick that Bruce pulls off over the course of the night. Beginning with such straight autobiography that it's almost paint-by-numbers, he engages in some of sleight of hand that brings us somewhere else entirely by the end of the night.

It begins subject-by-subject and chapter-by-chapter. Then there's the freedom of escape "Thunder Road," sung with great tenderness. Up to this point, the show seems to write itself. These are stirring, moving performances, each one: The memory of that sound echoes so much through "The Wish," you can only imagine how much it echoes through the writer's mind.

Something as simple as the smell of Nescafe coffee in the air, when Bruce describes it at the piano "Now, when it rains in Freehold…" , carries an evocative ache that you just can't get on the printed page. Anyone familiar with Springsteen's songbook — and particularly Chapter and Verse , the autobiography's companion album — might envision the songs that will follow.

After tracing some E Street glory and man, does "Tenth Avenue Freeze-out" on the piano not disappoint, confident and soulful , we'll find ourselves in the realm of "Brilliant Disguise," "Living Proof," and "Long Time Comin'.

It's gradually revealed that the story Bruce is choosing to tell is not that of his biography, his rise to superstardom, or his family, but of his engagement with the world around him. Somewhere in the middle of the evening's performance, after establishing his roots, Springsteen pans back. Linearity begins to drift; eras conflate.

This is where the us begins to become believable. He zooms out to tell an American story as much as a personal story, reflecting his own growing awareness of his country and its people, the revelations he met with as he left "the fucking boondocks" to go out into the world, the hopes and promises and challenges and failures of America.

The trajectory of Springsteen on Broadway is not so much boy to man, but from the sugar-dusted peaks of his Sugar Pops to the western mountains he recalls vividly from his first journey from coast to coast.

That awakening for Springsteen — to the beauty of America, and to the promises and improbabilities of the American Dream — entered his writing in the late-'70s and early '80s; Bruce himself traces the subject back to Darkness on the Edge of Town. And that's where it appears here, as he introduces a jangly "The Promised Land" with a passage from the book, the most direct "reading" he gives all night.

He describes that first cross-country trip, "where I saw the United States at its fullest, and I was overwhelmed by its beauty. The country was beautiful. I felt a great elation at the wheel as we crossed the western desert at dawn, the deep blue and purple shadowed canyons, the pale yellow morning sky with all of its color drawn out, leaving just the black silhouetted mountains behind us.

With the eastern sun rising at our backs, the deep reds and browns of the plains and hills came to life. Your palms turned salty white on the wheel from the aridity. Morning woke the Earth into muted color, then came the flat light of the midday sun, and everything stood revealed as pure horizon lowering on two lanes of black and disappearing into… nothing — my favorite thing.

Then the evening, with the sun burning red into your eyes, dropping gold into the western mountains. It all felt like home and I fell into a lasting love affair with the desert. With this riot of color tumbling out, after a black-and-white '50s childhood, it's a Wizard of Oz moment.

And it points the way to the rest of the show, where we're not in Freehold anymore. The Vietnam veteran of the "G. Blues" bottleneck string "Born in the U. He drives it home with "Land of Hope and Dreams," with a segue out of "Dancing in the Dark" that'll make you catch your breath. Love still plays a part — that, after all, has long been a subject of Bruce's work, too. Midway through the night, he introduces his wife and co-star to blend their voices for two absolutely gorgeous duets: Their intimacy points to a real hallmark of the whole night's experience.

For all the comparisons to previous acoustic tours and performances that might come to mind, Springsteen on Broadway is especially suited to one of the smaller houses in the theater district.

Springsteen has always been sensitive to venue, showing his love for the old buildings, eschewing newfangled skybox palaces when he can for arenas that show their age. The resulting feeling of intimacy accounts for a considerable part of the show's power — it's certainly part of what you're after when you pay your money down — and it's difficult to imagine this performance playing nearly as well in a larger hall.

It's tailored for the space. Springsteen rarely if ever moves past the proscenium — he doesn't need to reach out physically into the crowd to generate some connection; it's practically built in. But he maximizes the living room effect, stepping away from the mic at various points to let his voice be heard, unamplified, to the upper reaches.

There's a lot of room up there, for the spirits to swirl. And that's where the magic really comes in, as Springsteen conjures the ghosts not only of his own past, but of our own. And of our present. Of aging and memory. The putting away of childish things. There's so much space, in the songs and the stories, in the building and in the atmosphere Springsteen cultivates, for our own memories to overlay his.

Our mothers and fathers, our country, our soldiers, trees in our front yards, our shared histories, these are all in the mix — as is, perhaps most of all, as Springsteen puts it, "waking from the youthful spell of of immortality.

As the old saying goes, "You'll laugh, you'll cry…. That shared experience reaches its peak with the final song of the night, "Born to Run" on acoustic guitar. It's a song that for so many fans stirs up memories of countless nights with the E Street Band, in encore delirium — or perhaps a version very much like this one in — and it's long been one of the most communal experiences you'll find.

On Broadway it's a celebration, a benediction, an elegy, a commitment, a thank you, and a statement of community, Springsteen's palm finally beating out that proof of life before the lights go out. Another way Springsteen might describe his magic trick — or love, or a band, or rock 'n' roll — is the equation "one plus one equals three. It's when you get into the world of miracles, even everyday miracles. What Springsteen on Broadway demonstrates, as his performances have for decades, is that the equation actually makes sense — that in this kind of setting, something extra can happen so that there is a third thing, a bigger thing.

You plus me equals us. The mathematical proof for that may be beyond us, but it'll be thrillingly demonstrated nightly on 48th Street. The best Broadway shows do more than educate or entertain.

Something happens in a theater that differs from what takes place at a lecture or a concert. There is present what Springsteen calls a "third entity," an experience that transcends the verbal and the musical to become something else: When it succeeds, you feel it.

This is the magic of the theater, and Springsteen, who in his autobiography describes his success as a master illusionist and a magician, aims dead center for that mysterious theatrical ether. The show made me laugh, weep twice , and like all great theater helped me understand something not about the performer, but about myself.

Of course to hear Springsteen so intimately, in what feels like one's living room, makes the alchemy possible. Bruce has always been a storyteller, but the stories on stage have usually been in service of the songs. Now the songs serve the stories, and because of that we get to hear them in a new way.

It will be fun, once the show officially opens, to talk about story and song choices and maybe even suggest titles for Springsteen on Broadway. What I know is I've got four months to acquire another ticket.

Tonight on 48th Street, Bruce Springsteen made his Broadway debut to rapturous applause — at the outset, throughout, and of course, at show's end. People stay in their seats. Wait, is "Brooocing" a Broadway convention? Well, while we like the idea of a bit more appropriate audience decorum for this new venture we're not gonna actually make him tell us to "shut the fuck up," are we? While we're going to respect Broadway protocol — no reviews 'til opening night, don'tcha know, no spoilers here — a few unique moments are worth reporting.

When cheers went up in the crowd before lights went down, one might have thought Springsteen had pulled a "Boss sneak" and come out early And when Springsteen did take the stage, his first order of business was to "dedicate this show to my good friend Tom Petty I knew in the back of my mind it would be an abbreviated set, likely acoustic, but that didn't matter.

It was an opportunity to see Bruce perform once again, as I didn't have the luck, or the funds, to obtain tickets for the upcoming Broadway performances.

Making our way to the Air Canada Centre, it was clear that this was not going to be an ordinary show night, with a security perimeter setup around the entire arena. Biden, and Mme Trudeau, our Prime Minister's wife. As we entered the arena, we were handed a program which outlined the ceremony and included bios of all the performers. Also on the bill: While I thought that scheduling was unusual, I was certain there would be a surprise or two as the evening progressed.

After the parade of athletes and a few other announcements before the television audience joined the proceedings, it was off to the races. But an hour or so in, there was no mistaking the chorus of "Bruuuuce" that greeted our man as he stood solo, center stage, acoustic guitar at the ready. Springsteen launched into "Working on the Highway" first — an odd choice, I thought, perhaps a selection that he knew the non-fans in the audience would recognize, but it was clear that this was definitely a Bruce-friendly crowd.

The second song, "The Promised Land" was absolutely sublime, and Bruce appeared to get emotional and lose himself in the moment.

Last we were instructed by the Boss to put on our dancing shoes as he busted out "Dancing in the Dark. Before you knew it, Bruce's acoustic performance was over. Quick, but enjoyable despite the sound issues. Surely this wouldn't be the last we would see of him this evening, I thought — and fortunately I was right. After Bryan Adams finished playing his smash hit "Sumer of '69" with his band, he summoned "The Boss" and they launched into a full-band version of "Cuts Like a Knife.

Springsteen had performed the song acoustically himself a few years back, but this was a chance to see him let loose on the song's standard rock arrangement, sharing vocals with Adams.

Springsteen stayed on stage for one more song as Bryan explained it was time to return the favor and play one of Bruce's tunes. What followed was an impressive version of "Badlands," complete with chanting from the Bruce-centric crowd. Kudos to Bryan's harmony vocals, and to his band for stepping into some very large E Street Band shoes and doing the song justice. There was no sax player to be had, so the sax solo was replaced with guitar solos. The crowd continued the "whoa-oh-oh-ohs" as the song concluded and as HRH Prince Harry took the stage to embrace and thank both Bruce and Bryan.

Alas, this wasn't a concert but a ceremony that was being televised, so strict timelines needed to be adhered to. In the Prince's address to the athletes and crowd, he had mentioned that the atheletes had asked him last year to get Bruce for the closing ceremonies, so he proved to be a man good to his word! Unfortunately that did not include a surprise guest appearance from Bruce, but it was fun nonetheless as they performed a medley of some of their greatest hits, finishing with "Takin' Care of Business" — which I thought would be right up Bruce's alley, but it was not to be.

As we made our way out, we were wishing some U. We shook his hand, thanked him for his service and sacrifice to our country, and told him how proud we were of him. He spoke of how he wanted to continue in some fashion with the Invictus movement, and I can certainly understand why. Invictus is latin for "unconquered. With all due respect to Bruce and the other performers, to me that was the highlight of the evening. You can watch the Invictus Games Closing Ceremony at ctv.

Working on "cuts like a knife" backstage with brucespringsteen just before we went out and sang it for real at the invictusgames Toronto. What a moment to hang on to, thanks Bruce. A post shared by Bryan Adams bryanadams on Oct 1, at 2: The night before Springsteen's birthday, he rehearses again for invitees Monmouth University.

Thursday night at PNC it was all about Sweet Melissa, and although the event is called the Laid Back Festival, there was nothing laid back about it — especially when Bruce Springsteen joined in.

And how sweet it was. Shana Tovah to all! Geils Band's number one album — and one would have thought the 80's had come back to life.

It was a highlight of an evening filled with pure joy. But what is Christmas without Santa Bruce had been sitting in section , enjoying the show and saying hi to his neighbors and friends.

He actually told a woman sitting next to me, whom sees him at the gym a few times a week, "See ya tomorrow! Jackson Browne asked if this was still the Garden State Arts Center — part of the epic Running on Empty was recorded here, and he opened his set with "You Love the Thunder" as a tribute to that night 40 years ago. Other standouts with his fantastic band were "The Pretender" and my personal favorite "Redneck Friend," which I had not hear Browne sing in years "Honey you shake, I'll rattle, we'll roll on down the line Jackson was joined by Steven for his classic "I Am a Patriot," adding some very timely lyrics about racism, bigotry, and current events.

You could see the joy in their strut, revisiting this epic song together as on the Vote for Change tour. And then it was time for Bruce to make one more Jersey Jump on stage, for a nearly nine-minute performance of "Take it Easy" into "Our Lady of the Well," justr as it's sequenced on the For Everyman album.

After hanging back on "Our Lady of the Well," Springsteen the guitar-slinger threw in some sizzling riffs to finish off one of the least laid back evenings I've spent.

A Workshop, Springsteen's first run-through of Springsteen on Broadway set for a small group friends and family at Monmouth University. He mentioned that the last time they'd played together, at Hyde Park in London, they'd had the plug pulled on them by the authorities, so this time he hoped they'd be able to finish their song.

After playing it once, they made a snap and wise decision to play it again. Afterwards, as Bruce left the stage — grin still plastered to his face — he could be seen wiping a tear from his eye. An emotional night for all involved — especially the very lucky audience. It was such an unlikely occurrence that it seemed not only improbable but well nigh impossible that Bruce Springsteen would make an unannounced appearance on an Asbury Park stage on two successive nights.

It was unlikely even in the mid-'80s, when he was out and about on what seemed like a weekly basis. And we have a new album. Yeah," he smirked, "I only do this every 20 or 30 years. But against all odds, there he was again for the encore. After the outstanding full set from the Disciples, Stevie called out, "Where's my brother from another mother?

Trademark Fender guitar in hand, Bruce joined his old friend at center stage and helped close the show with two songs. There were many songs in the set that Springsteen could've guested on, but really, there was only one that would do for this type of an evening: It's difficult to overstate the emotional impact of the song on fans of the Jersey Shore music scene; like "I Don't Want to Go Home," it is, in a sense, every bit a part of their shared past as it is for its performers.

On Saturday night, even if it were just Van Zandt by himself at the mic, the song would have packed a powerful punch. But with these two lifelong friends and music partners sharing the mic at center stage, the performance became one for the ages.

What to close with, then? How about a Chuck Berry song? How about "Bye Bye Johnny"? How about Bruce taking the second verse, which more or less tells the story of his own life:. She remembered taking money out from gathering crop And buying Johnny's guitar at a broker shop As long as he would play it by the railroad side And wouldn't get in trouble he was satisfied But never thought that there would come a day like this When she would have to give her son a goodbye kiss At the song's conclusion, a beaming Bruce leaned into the mic and shouted "Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul!

The audience stood and clamored for several moments, but to no avail; there would be no encore. Van Zandt and his new Disciples will be performing many shows in the coming months, but there will be few to match what happened at the Paramount Theatre. Friday night, a sold-out Paramount Theatre bore witness not just to the world premiere of Just Before the Dawn: Riot, Redemption, Rock 'n' Roll , but the long-awaited onstage reunion of many of the key figures in the history of Asbury Park's legendary Upstage club.

While many of the musicians in attendance have appeared onstage together in various capacities over the years — many still live in the area — such gatherings have become increasingly rare. And the appearance of Asbury's unofficial "holy trinity" of Southside Johnny Lyon, Steven Van Zandt, and a surprise unbilled Bruce onstage together is also not something even longtime area residents have seen often.

Yet, here they were, gathered in celebration of their unique shared history in the short-lived venue on Cookman Avenue. As per usual for film premieres, many people associated with the film were in attendance for the Asbury Park Music and Film Festival event.

The documentary itself was well-received, as the audience greeted the appearance of familiar figures onscreen with warm applause. It's a fairly straightforward doc that employs all the standard techniques — archival film footage, candid interviews, voice-over narration — and audiences looking for a brief history of a familiar place and time with some great music will come away satisfied.

Entertaining as Just Before the Dawn is, however, it barely scratches the surface of its subject. The history of the Upstage and the larger story of Asbury Park's rise and fall are vast and complex topics that don't easily lend themselves to the minute documentary format. Historians like Daniel Wolff Fourth of July, Asbury Park and Charles and Margaret Horner Classic Urban Harmony have been wise to explore this complicated history not by being all-inclusive, but by honing on particular aspects of the story — a key theme or genre, a particular series of events.

The story of Asbury Park in many ways is a story of America in microcosm, a conundrum that demands a long-form, multi-episode format.

Unfortunately, much of the tale still waits to be told. Taking in the film, sitting a few rows back from the screen in the darkened Paramount Theatre, must have been a déjà vu moment for Bruce and Steven. Their appearance onstage a few minutes after the intermission was no great surprise to many in attendance. Indeed, no small number of tickets were snatched up in the hours just prior to the event, as word filtered out that a Springsteen appearance was in the offing.

Nonetheless, a thrilled audience leapt to its feet when the curtain drew back to reveal Little Steven and his new Disciples lineup augmented by a certain Freehold native on Gibson guitar and, to his left, former local whiz kid David Sancious and another local bandleader by the name of Southside Johnny.

Southside burst into a Jukes-esque, horn-drenched "Blues is My Business," and the night was off and running on all eight cylinders. After the Berry tribute, Steven and much of his band departed, leaving Southside joined by Jukes bassist John Conte and ex-Jukes drummer Joe Bellia at the front mic to belt a cover of B. Dressed in work shirt and jeans, an unassuming Bruce hung back from the center mic for a good portion of the show. On a night celebrating the communal spirit of the Upstage, the frontman role was shared by many, with Asbury Jukes keyboardist and official ringleader Jeff Kazee somehow managing to coordinate the comings and goings of an endless array of musicians and instruments without any apparent mishaps.

The Upstage Jam Band returned with Messrs. Springsteen and Lyon in tow, backing the two of them as Bruce took lead vocals on a version of Little Richard's "Lucille" punctuated by DeSarno and Ryan guitar solos.

Bruce calling for Sancious to play the Hammond B-3 was priceless; "When I first saw him, he was playing the organ," he commented afterward. He remembered all the words! Bruce left the stage briefly to make way for Jeff Kazee's lead vocal turn on "Fortunate Son" before reemerging to wind down the set.

Southside stepped back to center mic to lead off the Jukes classic "I Don't Wanna Go Home" with a few bars of "Stand by Me," which was followed by a set-closing, all-hands-on-deck jam on yet another Chuck Berry medley, "Johnny B.

Goode" into "Roll Over, Beethoven. It was a rocking, satisfying night of music that reflected the true Upstage spirit, with familiar Asbury Park faces like LaBella and Marc Ribler mixed in with the talent-laden lineup of assorted Disciples, Upstagers and Jukes all generously sharing the limelight.

Even with Bruce and Southside doing the yeoman's share of leads, there was plenty of room for each musician to have a moment or two to shine, just as they had in the old days. As it did in , the Springsteen tour of Australia and New Zealand finished in an industrialized section of Auckland on a warm summer's night.

Three years ago Born to Run was played in its entirety and "My City of Ruins" was dedicated to the people of Christchurch. On Saturday night the show began with three Born in the U. Both tour closers sent Kiwis and Aussies and global denizens of E Street Nation into the night with aching feet, strained vocal chords and the usual conjecture about when if? Bruce and the band would be back again. There was a marked difference Saturday night from the tour finale, however, and it wasn't found on stage.

It was dripping from the eyes and down the cheeks of people throughout Mt Smart Stadium. Women, men, young, old. Tears that fell throughout the night but poured during a final acoustic "Thunder Road. Tears of joy and sadness like I've never seen at a concert before. We're all getting older; appearances to the contrary the man himself is closing on 70, and the E Street Band has herculean numbers on its odometer.

Does that explain it? After losing so much grace and greatness in , are we more aware of the mortality of our heroes? We know this won't go on forever: If so, Saturday night in Auckland — and I don't care how corny this sounds — was all sevens. Blatant, unapologetic corniness is a symptom of repeated exposure to Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. Each Springsteen concert is like a beam of white light through a prism that results in a rainbow of perspectives and opinions.

This summer tour closer would be the rare gig that all factions could agree on — it was a Get Off Your Ass and Dance show through and through. And that's clearly what Springsteen had in mind: Bruce had a firm hand on the wheel all night, the collective eyes of the band locked on him even more than usual, a breakneck pace maintained by The Boss from the band's entrance at 7: You'd be hard pressed to find a trio of songs less open to misinterpretation than "Darlington County," "Working on the Highway," and "Glory Days.

Darkness had yet to fall on Mt Smart Stadium, so no spotlight was needed to watch Bruce saunter from the stage to the lip of the pit, all Stones-y riff and working-man shirt. In his Born to Run book Bruce wrote about knowing that he "played," not "worked," for a living, but on this night he was working hard to connect with people in the rectangular, rugby field dimensions of Mt Smart Stadium. During a typically exuberant "Working on the Highway" he put a fine point on it, challenging the crowd — "Lemme see ya work that thing!

An audibled "Glory Days" — the mic guy was sent scurrying back after retrieving it from the pit stage and Kevin had to be told directly by Bruce which guitar he needed — had Bruce imploring his consigliere "C'mon, work that thing Steve!

At one point Steve slipped a pair of party glasses on Bruce's face. A quick peek at a video screen provided an answer. Are the people with me? A sufficiently affirmative response made him cry "It's ass-shaking time! These Born in the U. But as Bruce drew a "99" in the air for another audible it was clear he was going with his gut, and his gut said roadhouse. The band modified accordingly and a trashy, honky tonk "Johnny 99" ensued with Soozie, Nils and Jake doing solos and joining Bruce on the pit stage lip to a stomping finish.

And c'mon the sax man did, all for the sake of those "in the stands. Putting things back together… after they've fallen apart. You gotta use your hands now. Since I've written [the song] it's become about a lot of different things, mainly about the things that we lose as life goes on. The older you get, the more that loss weighs on you. Big, bad-ass, beloved, missing Clarence. Bruce out amongst us before directing his band to the song's gentle finish.

Nightfall blanketed New Zealand's North Island as Jake held onto his anger during a roaring "Wrecking Ball" and the show's core temperature began to rise. Bruce yelled "Promised Land" to his bandmates before his harmonica sang and we were reminded that the quality of our lives may rise and fall but Springsteen's catalog of songs never wavers.

We just relate to those songs differently. Max's high-hat signalled "Candy's Room," and we were in that rare concert zone when it feels like the ground below us could fall away but we'd remain floating in place.

Max's jackhammered snare gave way to Bruce's wailing guitar and in a few seconds Roy's intro to "Because the Night" unleashed the most intense version of the song on this tour. By the time Captain Lofgren finished his whirling dervish solo we were swept up in a current and dropped on our heads and barely had time to breathe before "The Rising" started and the cycle repeated.

For one last time the furious perfection of "Badlands" had us bouncing in place and shouting like mad. A wild, joyous, goofy, exhausting "Rosalita" ended this foursome of '70s thunderclaps that's a fountain of youth to older fans and an affirmation of rock 'n' roll's power to those weaned on a variation neutered by corporate-owned radio monopolies and TV "talent" shows.

After thanking Auckland and saluting the Auckland City Mission for doing God's work, Bruce said "This is the last night of our tour down here" and breathlessly thanked a litany of tour personnel with special shout outs to longtime concert producer George Travis and "Ms. Barbara Carr" of Jon Landau Management. Bruce repeated "until the end… forever friends" in a whisper and pointed to the heavens with both hands, acknowledging a stadium full of forever friends while my ex-pat heart broke for so many friends left behind in the States Max pounded the "Hiding on the backstreets" crescendo into our skulls, and Bruce delivered a vocal performance as raw and real as the words themselves.

The big four of "Born to Run," "Dancing in the Dark" the only song to acknowledge sign wavers on this night , "Tenth Avenue Freeze-out" and "Shout" got one last blowout before a tear-jerking acoustic "Thunder Road" brought the tour to a close. Bruce said, "Thanks for a great night. We'll be seeing ya. Friends huddled in circles, others stood alone, smiles creasing faces that ain't that young anymore. Glistening eyes took one last look around the quickly dissipating closing-night crowd, paths crossed on tour about to bring us home to our everyday lives.

Lives that, unlike a Bruce show, offer no guarantees. Lives that for some had been on hold for five weeks after this tour began on a January night in Perth, Australia when Bruce declared the band's allegiance with a "new American resistance.

With a raw longing for this magical circus to continue we bade tearful goodbyes and told each other we'd do it again someday. While that may or may not be true, we also swore forever friends. And that, my friends, will be true… until the end. Bruce Springsteen often refers to his time on stage as his job. Tuesday night in Christchurch it was his calling, and he wore that calling on his sleeve.

Bruce knew it; all 30, people in attendance knew it: This one was necessary. This one would echo long after the band left AMI Stadium — a temporary structure built after Christchurch's rugby stadium was heavily damaged in the February 22, earthquake — as a tribute to those lost and a celebration of being glad to be alive. When this show appeared on the Summer Tour itinerary it was easy to imagine it being special.

That earthquake killed and left its historic city center in ruins. Multiple aftershocks have rocked the Canterbury region. A tsunami threatened the South Island's east coast last year. The citizens of Christchurch have been roiled and frustrated and discouraged by redevelopment delays. It's no exaggeration to say this Christchurch concert has been anticipated for generations. An optimist says this particular show by this particular band couldn't have come at a better time.

A pessimist says no show could live up to such weighty expectations. What does The Boss say? The Boss says it's ass-shaking time. The Boss, as always, is right, and everything, absolutely everything, is alright.

To understand tonight's cathartic show you must know about Wendy Davie. She's an emergency room nurse who married a Christchurch boy, raised three kids and on February 22, did what so many of her fellow citizens did: Wendy's multiple casualty disaster training made her more prepared than most; she'd taken a break from her nursing career in , but this detail meant nothing in the minutes after the quake as she attempted to resuscitate a man crushed by a collapsed café.

She then volunteered herself to a trio of policemen. They drove her into Christchurch's devastated CBD, where she checked in with a commander who gave her his jacket and helmet and sent her to the collapsed Pyne Gould Corporation building. There she helped set up a triage area for victims of the pancaked five-story structure, a place where 18 people lost their lives. Later that night, after a tearful reunion with her family in their quake-damaged home nearly every home in Christchurch was damaged or destroyed by that historically powerful earthquake , she and her husband Pete lay in bed and agreed there was only one thing for them to do: The seed was planted more than three years ago on the day the Springsteen tour of Australia and NZ was announced.

The itinerary included two shows in Auckland but none in Christchurch. Wendy's a fan, but it was lifelong diehard Pete who asked, "How fucking hard could it be?

On her lunch break the next day Wendy started finding out by setting up a "Come to Christchurch Bruce Springsteen" Facebook page. After sending invitations to a small circle of friends, she was startled to watch the page attract more than 11, followers in ten days. As it was difficult to contact anyone in the Springsteen organization, she informed Frontier Touring of the petition but never heard a word in response.

That word came from Springsteen himself tonight in his introduction to "My City of Ruins": Wanted us to come and play. It took a while, but I'm glad we got here. I got a chance to drive around and take a look at the city today. I want to send this out to everyone who suffered in the earthquake, send out our love and prayers, and to the emergency services who I know are working today to contain the fires outside of town.

This is for those folks… and for all of you. Can a song possess the person who wrote it? It'll come off as hyperbolic, but Bruce was more than a preacher on this night — he was a messenger, conjurer, shaman, healer. But tonight Bruce recalibrated it and set it loose within the hearts of the people of Christchurch like a voodoo man stealing souls and setting them free in a better, less lonely place.

Prior to this the band had hit the stage at 7: The sun had yet to set behind the stage, but the air was cool — a perfect night for a city never listed on a Springsteen T-shirt until After a guttural "Finally! Bruce's fierce vocals were complemented by a searing guitar duel between he and Steve, who was in spectacular form all night. Don't think it's ever occurred to me at a Bruce show, but it seemed the songs themselves were secondary to the touching of skin, the making of eye contact, the involvement of "the stands.

Everything changed with "My City of Ruins. He let the song's gentle beginning wash over the crowd before making the introduction that set Wendy's heart afire. Collection of the artist; courtesy The Green Gallery, Milwaukee.

Students from the school will meet in the Museum for their lessons over the course of the exhibition, and works by Biennial artists Sky Hopinka and Jessi Reaves will be on view in the school. The energy of the large group of young, curious students activates the Museum to function differently, while placing artworks at the school recontextualizes them as tools for learning. Visitors should enter through the red doors.

The main entrance to LOMA is not wheelchair accessible, however alternate entry is available by request. To make an appointment or to inquire about access concerns please contact us at info whitney. Chemi Rosado Seijo b. Courtesy Embajada, San Juan. Like a truncated history painting, an epic scene is glimpsed between two doors that may be closing or opening.

Schutz deploys the transitional space of the elevator as a metaphor for other social spaces that are at once public and private, intimate and estranging, inviting us to consider our own position or role amid the chaos. Oil on canvas, x in. Stark hand-painted page-spreads from the title essay in his book Censorship Now!! Artists, he proposes, should take control of censorship in order to eliminate everything from bland nonsense to mass-produced pop to expressions of fascist ideology.

She painted the text on a monumental scale, indicating a high level of commitment to his radical position, especially the ideas in passages she has underlined. Torey Thornton employs an eclectic range of materials in his work, adopting a collage-like approach that reflects an expanded conception of painting. Occasionally incorporating fragments of plastic or wood, Thornton populates his paintings on panel with a mix of ambiguous forms, frenetic drawing, and cartoonish objects, all suspended within a purposefully indeterminate pictorial space.

Photograph by Cooper Dodds. Since the s, John Divola has used photography to explore themes of neglect and disuse in his native Southern California. Divola incorporated the salvaged paintings into his work, hanging the aspirational, often-unfinished canvases on the walls of abandoned buildings. In the resulting photographs, the paintings seem both out of place and uncannily suited to their surroundings. Inkjet print, 44 x 54 in. The gradual rise of a tower at the World Trade Center complex and changing seasons mark the passage of time in his ever-shifting portrait of the city.

High-definition video, color, silent; approx. Photograph by Oto Gillen. The two works on view in the Biennial, Exodus and Evolution , are part of a larger in-process project, The Floating World , which addresses the social and environmental impacts of climate change. In Exodus , the series of eBay-sourced figurines that rotate around a screen in an endless march are evocative of mass migrations of people, whether from natural disasters or political situations such as the Syrian refugee crisis.

Evolution focuses attention on rising sea levels; two figures in snorkel gear take pictures, apparently indifferent to or ignorant of any impending danger.

Collection of the artist; courtesy Salon 94, New York. Moyer begins a painting by creating small collages from cut paper, using the bold, graphic shapes as scaffolding for expanses of poured acrylic, a medium she prefers both for its material versatility and its popular connotations: The forms are constantly shifting from the familiar to the strange in a way that seems to escape words.

Acrylic and glitter on canvas, 96 x 78 in. The artist and his family were some of the , people who inhabited the tiny island between and ; it was once one of the most densely populated places in the world. After the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees shuttered the camp in , Pulau Bidong became overgrown by jungle, filled with crumbling monuments and relics. Tuan Andrew Nguyen b. Ultra-high-definition video, color, sound; Her images personalize the immigrant experience and give visibility to the normally unseen.

Oil on linen, 68 x 88 in. A Very Long Line , a video installation by Postcommodity, focuses on the border between the United States and Mexico, an emotionally and politically charged site that has become even more contentious through the election and the beginning of the current presidential administration.

In this case, what has been forgotten—primarily by citizens of the United States—is the Indigenous status of peoples from the Western Hemisphere, including immigrants from Mexico and Guatemala.

Forgotten, too, are the Indigenous trade and migration routes that have crisscrossed what is now the border since before European colonization. Filmed from the window of a car, A Very Long Line brings those routes into the dizzying present, one in which the border is never fully known or understood.

Postcommodity founded , still from A Very Long Line , Four-channel digital video, color, sound. Maya Stovall employs a mix of anthropological observation and urban intervention to create what she considers performance and ethnography. In Liquor Store Theatre , she dances on the sidewalks and streets outside neighborhood liquor stores, combining elements of ballet and contemporary movement. The artist focused on liquor stores in particular because they serve as hubs of both commerce and community, with individuals selling clothing, electronic goods, and other everyday items in their immediate vicinity.

Digital video, color, sound; 4 min. Courtesy the artist, Eric Johnston, and Todd Stovall. It is centered on a prospecting mission in the Brazilian Amazon: The plant is thus imagined as a trophy for the pharmaceutical industry and a screen for colonialist projections onto the rainforest. High-definition 3D video, color, sound; 22 min. Executive Solutions meanwhile presents desolate scenes of apathy, alienation, and exhaustion.

These paintings mix Renaissance practices such as the use of encaustic and one-point perspective with cartoons, manga, and anime characters—visually collapsing the past and present to use allegory as a form of live-action or real-time role-play.

Each of the first five movements is its own unique composition. The sixth movement, accompanied by a projected film, fuses all five compositions into one simultaneous performance. Music composition in six parts and two videos, color, sound: Hughes frequently begins a composition by altering the canvas surface in ways that she then has to improvise against.

She might cover part of the canvas in a gessoa thick, gluelike substance that lends the surface a feeling of solidity—or she might spray paint the canvas from behind, making marks that emerge murkily from beneath the weave. Oil, acrylic and dye on canvas, 68 x 60 in.

Collection of the artist; courtesy Rachel Uffner, New York. Larry Bell has exploited the transparency and reflectivity of glass to great effect since the beginning of his career, when he inserted a square piece of glass into a painting and titled it Ghost Box Over the years, Bell has developed coating and laminating techniques in order to tint his sculptures or imbue them with metallic or smoky finishes.

On the fifth-floor terrace, Bell has installed Pacific Red II , a work consisting of six laminated glass cubes; each measures six by eight feet and encloses another six-by-four-foot glass box. The multiple surfaces interplay and respond to their urban surroundings, where glass towers abound. Laminated glass, twenty-four 72 x 96 in.

In American Pictures , a tree trunk covered with the bloodred crushed bodies of cochineal insects is skewered on a wrought-iron bar. The carnation petals scattered across the gridded base are renewed regularly by Museum staff, suggesting a ritual action, as when one leaves flowers at a grave.

If—as the title suggests—this is a picture of America, then it is one haunted by the specter of brutality and death. Reclaimed wrought iron, wood, crushed cochineal insects, staples, industrial work mats, and carnations, 72 x 48 x 48 in. Throughout her career, Ulrike Müller has explored issues of gender and queer experience, and questioned how collaboration can trouble fixed notions of identity. Those commitments manifest subtly in her installation for the Biennial, which Müller sited in a transitional space, a passageway that she extended, painted, and transformed to create an almost sculptural presence.

For example, a series of works on paper—quirkily libidinous riffs on modernist abstraction—makes emphatic use of the brush, playing off the idea that the implement is an extension of the hand. Cauleen Smith, who trained as a filmmaker, designed the elaborately hand-stitched banners on view in the Biennial to be used in processions. On the other side of the banners, private symbols—including instruments of communication, drops of blood, and surrogates for the human body—suggest the urgent need to be heard in a time of struggle.

Satin, poly-satin, quilted pleather, upholstery, wool felt, wool velvet, indigo-dyed silk-rayon velvet, indigo-dyed silk satin, embroidery floss, metallic thread, acrylic fabric paint, acrylic hair beads, acrylic barrettes, satin cord, polyester fringe, poly-ilk- tassels, plastic-coated paper, and sequins.

Collection of the artist; courtesy Corbett vs. Typically used by city or county governments as austerity measures, these bonds privatize social services, creating investment opportunities. Details regarding the operation of Social Impact Bonds are limited to investors, who sign a non-disclosure agreement to that effect.

By utilizing the investment capacity of the Museum, Rowland provides a path for the public to receive information on this Social Impact Bond. Institutional investment in Social Impact Bond. In its unused utility closet, Jamison has installed a Dell computer purchased on eBay identical to one that he found in this location during a site visit.

Aaron Flint Jamison b. Dell computer, server, custom computer application, email disclaimer, artist book added to daily from an edition of 80 , cedar, purple heart, aluminum, and nylon, dimensions variable.

The work is the result of an intense back and forth during which the artists concurrently edited materials from their bases of New York and Berlin to create a shared audiovisual language. Alternating between kaleidoscopic grids of heavily manipulated imagery and sparse shots of traffic, figures, animals, and cityscapes, Crossing suggests primal connections between nature and technology and creates new and unexpected ways of understanding otherwise familiar images.

High-definition video, color, sound; Courtesy the artists and Rodeo, London. Beatriz Santiago Muñoz examines postcolonial experiences in the Caribbean, considering how perceptions of authenticity and artifice have historically worked to inform identity. Filmed in Haiti, Marché Salomon reimagines the titular bustling local market as a cosmic system.

Navy training and bombing range. In both works Santiago Muñoz films people using improvisation, choreographed gestures, and reenactment to convey lived histories and symbolic alternatives to them. Beatriz Santiago Muñoz b. In her sprawling, feature-length film Ouroboros , Basma Alsharif pays homage to the Gaza Strip in an allegorical narrative that posits the end of civilization is also its beginning and that hope can emerge from destruction. Evoking the symbol of the ouroboros, a serpent devouring its own tail, the film alludes to the cyclical nature of both life and history via the epic journey of the heartbroken protagonist, Diego Marcon.

Ouroboros positions us to consider hope, loss, and fragmentation, both from inside and from the margins of the wreckage. High-definition video, color, sound, approx. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Imane Farès, Paris. As the women reflect on their lives and work, a promised land comes into view built around sexual display and the desiring gaze of queer women of color, a utopian community organized and sustained by a Black, female microeconomy where money and explicit performances are exchanged in a spirit of ecstatic self-determination.

When after several years this utopia erodes, the Shakedown dancers are forced to adapt and confront the reality of commodified labor and hourly wages. The subculture Weinraub documents in SHAKEDOWN is propelled by female creators infamous in their own community but whose cultural contributions are alternately pirated or ignored by society at large.

As a filmmaker, Weinraub has sought to document a new phase in the avant-garde, one led by autonomous communities of color, whose creative output has often been extracted and monetized by mass culture but whose stories have rarely been told on their own terms.

Digital video, color, sound; 64 min. Using both original scripted and found material, Leventhal creates complex layers of meaning through montage, which renders micronarratives of mortality and desire. In Platonic , a series of recounted stories are interwoven with collected and manipulated images, revealing some of the innumerable idiosyncrasies of human relations. Strangely Ordinary This Devotion by Leventhal and Sheilah Wilson, is a visceral exploration of domesticity, queer desire, and fantasy in a world under the threat of climate change; both utilizing and exploding archetypes, the film offers a radical approach to collaboration and the concept of family.

In each of these works, Leventhal and her collaborators collect and arrange images and moments that are at once peculiar and banal, precious and disturbing, creating resonance and contrast through experimental modes of storytelling.

High-definition video, color, sound, 27 min. Courtesy the artist and Video Data Bank, Chicago. In both of his films screening as part of the Biennial, Eric Baudelaire utilizes Japanese filmmaker Masao Adachi's concept of fukeiron landscape theory , which posits that the landscape itself is a signifier of power structures, turning his camera at the landscape as seen by his subjects. May Shigenobu, the Lebanon-born daughter of the founder of the communist militant Japanese Red Army; and Masao Adachi, an activist filmmaker who joined the Red Army in Lebanon to support the Palestinian armed resistance.

Likewise, Also Known as Jihadi uses landscape cinematography and judicial documents to chronicle the journey of a young Islamic State recruit from the neighborhood on the outskirts of Paris where he grew up to the prison in which he is incarcerated today.

High-definition video, color, sound; 99 min. Courtesy Poulet-Malassis Films, Paris. Groundbreaking avant-garde filmmaker Robert Beavers uses 16mm film to portray the textures and intimacies of everyday life. In Pitcher of Colored Light and The Suppliant , Beavers renders the domestic spaces of his aging mother and a deceased friend with formal precision and tenderness.

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